What is a Laser Scanning Processes?

The third in a series of articles explaining 3D scanning, this article explains the difference between b-scan and d-scan. D-scan is a full scan of the model. B-scan is simply a photo or computer image of the model. Read more on 3d laser scanning.

A d-scan is the best option for keeping a model as is or as close to how it will look at the time of printing. It keeps all components in the same place. B-scan is a photo image of the model. This model will need to be scanned again with each printing process.

D-scan is the preferred method of laser scanning today. Photogrammetry scanning, using a high speed camera, creates a digital model of a work piece. The scan from the camera is then converted into an image file which can be opened by a computer.

B-scan is the method of most modelers today. It is also called d-scan or photo scan. B-scan is a photo image of the model.

B-scan is not a scan like a d-scan. It is a photo of the model taken with a high-speed camera. The b-scan was initially meant to be used in rendering, a computer-aided design (CAD) process, not in actual production. Still it is an excellent choice for that final scanning stage of the printing process.

The b-scan does not require sophisticated calibration procedures. It is simply a scan. It is the same as using a standard camera. The only special maintenance required is that the final scan image should be saved in a .jpg format.

Laser scanning equipment is designed for quick, accurate, and inexpensive scans. It does not use complicated calibration techniques. It simply uses a digital picture of the model to scan the model.

If you are currently using an inkjet, laser, or inkjet/photocopy machine to make your prints, you are probably very familiar with the image quality of those models. You probably are also familiar with the machine quality and calibration problems. You may have even worked with some of the problems. Such problems as clouding of the printing paper when printing, ghosts and dots on the model, and others are quite common with such machines.

If you are currently using an inkjet, laser, or inkjet/photocopy machine to make your prints, you are probably very familiar with the image quality of those models. You probably are also familiar with the machine quality and calibration problems. You may have even worked with some of the problems.

Such problems as clouding of the printing paper when printing, ghosts and dots on the model, and others are quite common with such machines. It would be quite a task to install and calibrate every single printer today. And yet they still exist.

When using d-scan and b-scan to scan your model, you do not have to worry about the calibration and machine problems. You do not have to use special d-scan calibration procedures, and you do not have to learn and maintain complicated calibration techniques.

Once the scanner is set up, it automatically produces 3D computer images and virtually any other scanning format that are supported by the computer. So there is no reason for a new laser scanner to require complex calibration procedures.